EXAMPLE

A CBA method thatís called The Simplified Two-List Method is presented near the beginning of the CBA training process.  This method is near the middle level of complexity in the CBA system. Some CBA methods are more complex than this method, while others are simpler. Itís an excellent method for individuals, families, business organizations, and government agencies. It makes the process visible with a minimum of writing. Therefore, itís an excellent method to use for simple, two-option decisions during decision meetings.

The following version of this method is for non-money and equal-money decisions (a slightly different version is required for money decisions). As follows, this method requires only two central activities.
 

The Simplified Two-List Method

  1. List the ADVANTAGES of each alternative.
  2. Without deciding the importance of each individual advantage, simply choose the alternative with the most important set of advantages.
In the following example, the two advantages of Canoe C outweigh the one advantage of Canoe K ó according to the stakeholders. Therefore, they selected Canoe C.
 
Advantages of Canoe C
Advantages of Canoe K
  • 10 Pounds Lighter 
  • Moderately Greater Stability 
  • Slightly Smother 
    Finish

Notice that in this method the advantages of the alternatives are displayed, not the attributes. For example, the advantage of Canoe C, in weight, is 10 pounds, not 65 pounds. Because there is a large difference between 10 pounds and 65 pounds, listing the advantage as 65 pounds would be a large mistake. Remember: Decisions must be based on the importance of advantages, not attributes.
 

How to Simplify Sound Decisionmaking

Listing only the advantages of each alternative is obviously much simpler than listing the advantages and the disadvantages. Nevertheless, for many, their first impression is that CBA is too complex. Apparently, they are confusing unfamiliarity with complexity. CBA simplifies sound decisionmaking as follows:

CBA can do only its part in simplifying sound decisionmaking. Decisionmakers must do the rest. They must learn, practice, teach, and consistently use sound methods. The more they practice the methods that are presented in the CBA workshops, the simpler these methods will become.